ORG

What Price Security Surveillance Now?

Adrian Farrel's picture

A couple of weeks ago I attended a meeting of the Manchester branch of the Open Rights Group to discuss the proposed Investigatory Powers Bill known as the IPBill and currently about to be discussed and voted on by the House of Lords.

The meeting included a showing of The Haystack (http://thehaystackdocumentary.squarespace.com/watch/) a short documentary film about surveillance in the UK. We then had an open discussion of the film and the IPBill with a panel including Gary Herman from the National Union of Journalists, Gary Hough from Zen Internet, Loz Kaye from Open Intelligence, and myself.

While recognising the threats posed by terrorism, paedophilia, and organised crime, the room seemed unanimous in its belief that the IPBill is poorly conceived, lacking in detail, and over-reaching in its powers. For some background on the IPBill see https://wiki.openrightsgroup.org/wiki/Investigatory_Powers_Bill.

ORGCON -- will you be there?

Peter Brett's picture

The Open Rights Group, a UK lobbying organisation that has similar aims to those of the Pirate Party, is holding its conference in London this coming Saturday, the 24th July. We've been given a slot at the end of the day, in which I'm going to be giving a short talkand Q&A about why ORG supportrs should also support the Pirate Party.

Tags: 

The Digital Economy Bill has passed

Editor's picture

So. The Digital Economy Bill -- soon to be the Digital Economy Act -- has passed its third reading.

Numerous campaigning groups opposed this bill -- The Open Rights GroupDon't Disconnect Us38 Degrees. Unfortunately they failed, because politicians don't listen to reasoned argument, and care more about corporate interests than the rights of the British people (there are a few honourable exceptions, for example Tom Watson).

The digital economy versus the Digital Economy Bill

Editor's picture

I was at an Open Rights Group event in Edinburgh yesterday, about lobbying MPs regarding the DE Bill. One of the attendees, Hugh Hancock, pointed out that he will likely be harmed by the DE Bill, even though he is a creative person who is part of the digital economy, one of the very group of people this bill is ostensibly intended to help. (Of course, we all know that the DE is really there to protect the content distribution industry, not creative people).

Sign the petition, and Talk Talk like a Pirate!

Editor's picture

Recently we've seen a wide array of campaigns and discussion forums about pirate politics. Billy Bragg has started a discussion blog, the Open Rights Group have done a lot of good work to raise awareness and talk sense about disconnection, and of course they have been a lot of petitions set up on the Number 10 website aimed at pointing out how wrong the government are to wage war on their own citizens over file sharing.

Now, a new player has entered the field of pirate politics, with a campaign against disconnection. Andrew Heany's petition against disconnections is different in one major way from all the others because it has the backing of the company he works for. Since he's Executive Director of strategy and Regulation at Talk Talk, this means we now have one of Britain's biggest ISPs actively supporting pirate policies.

More Information

Chat with us

   

Upcoming Dates

Social Media

Twitter icon Facebook icon RSS icon YouTube icon

Current Internal Elections

We are not currently running any internal elections but to see what positions are open for nominations, check here.