The BPI's "Digital Music Nation 2010" report

Peter Brett's picture

The BPI announced their latest report on digital music sales and "piracy", entitled Digital Music Nation 2010. As usual, it consists of a careful mix of truth, lies, delicately chosen misleading statistics and precisely spun industry snapshots.  TorrentFreak have published some initial analysis. While we go through the report with a fine-toothed comb and a magnifying glass to try and figure out what's reallygoing on, my take on the situation can be found after the cut.

 

Pirate Party UK welcomes record industry to 21st century

The Pirate Party UK welcomed the BPI's announcement that the UK music industry is finally entering the 21st century.  In the BPI "Digital Music Nation 2010" report, issued today, the industry announced with pride that "there are now 67 legal digital music services" and that "many music fans have enthusiastically embraced these services."  Geoff Taylor, the BPI Chief Executive, went on to say, "Over the last five years, the legal digital music market has been an online innovation success story."

The Pirate Party would like to congratulate the music industry on finally figuring out what they have been being told for more than ten years.  Indeed, it is well documented that Internet-based music sharing has to a great extent owed its meteoric rise in popularity around the turn of the century to the music industry's complete refusal to adapt its business model to the possibilities arising from high-speed global communications and digital copying.

"I find it the height of irony," said Peter Brett, Campaigns Officer of the Pirate Party, "Record labels fought so long and hard to prevent new and innovative businesses from taking proper advantage of the Internet at the turn of the century, but are now attempting to take credit for those few that have succeeded in spite of their determined opposition."

The Party is looking forward to the record industries' realisation that cutting end users off from the Internet will harm digital music sales, and the BPI's support in campaigning for a repeal of the 2010 Digital Economy Act. "Judging by their performance in recent years," Peter Brett went on to say, "We might expect them to join our campaign in early 2020."